12 June 2005

Book meme

Okay, I've decided to stick with the theme here and go with entomology books. It was a bit easier than I thought.

How many [entomology] books do I own?
Hmm, about 60. Not bad for an ornithologist.

Last [entomology] book purchased.
Dragonflies and Damselflies of Texas and the South-Central United States by John Abbott.

Last [entomology] book I read.
Well, they tend to be reference books, so I don't really read them cover to cover. Last one I referred to was Ed Lam's stunning Damselflies of the Northeast. I use this book so much in the field, it fell apart. I put the pages in sheet protectors and it's in a binder in my car. Another that got the same treatment is The Dragonflies and Damselflies of Ohio, edited by Bob Glotzhober and Dave McShaffrey. They are easier to use than the big texts, Needham, Westfall, and May's Dragonflies of North America and Westfall and May's Damselflies of North America, both of which I also own. The last entomology reference book I actually read pretty thoroughly was Corbet's Dragonflies: Behavior and Ecology of Odonata. Yes! How geeky of me! I read it, highlighted it, and was duly inspired! The 1962 version is online. I do have a bunch of butterfly and moth books that I use regularly, too.

The five [entomology] books that influenced you the most.
1. and 2. Grassroot Jungles and Near Horizons by Edwin Way Teale. I read all his books early in my writing career; these were wonderful essays on insects and the natural world close at hand. He was one of the last great popular natural history writers, and he greatly influenced that aspect of my writing.
3. and 4. The Golden Guide to Insects and The Golden Guide to Butterflies and Moths. What kid could do without them? The latter is still a great little reference to lepidoptera larvae, although now new field guides are finally coming on the scene.
5. Dragonflies through Binoculars by Sid Dunkle. The first field guide to dragonflies. There wasn't much point in trying to go out and identify them before this book, and look what he inspired! [One day, there will be a very cool book on Michigan odonata, of which I hope to be co-author. We're just waiting to steal all the great ideas of other state publications first, right Mark?]

Five other bloggers [who at least sometimes write about insects or invertebrates] to tag with this meme:

I'd ask that these folks respond to the meme in it's original form -- all books -- rather than entomology books. I'd really like to know what they find interesting and influencial outside this field. (I can direct folks to my original list, if they are interested).

2 comments:

fred said...

I'm on task. Dang. Got two book meme tags in the same day, even though I made a point to keep my head down and not make eye contact with any of the previous tag-ees. Hope to have something up by the weekend, and not a ONE of my books mentioned in my response will even have the word "dragonfly" in their contents. I think. -- Fred of Fragments

Dope on the Slope said...

Damn nice blog. I'll try to get something up about the creepy crawler tomes that influenced me sometime this later this week. I'd do it sooner if I could figure out a way to avoid this specimen known as Macromania micromanagia. I'd like to punch him in the ligula sometimes I tells ya.

Great blog BTW. I'll add you to my roll.